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DER DREHORT
Ein Augenblick des Glücks, bereitet von Vollblutkomödianten. Harrington Harbor, ein Dorf ohne Autos mit Bürgersteigen aus Holz auf einer abgelegenen Insel, bot sich als Drehort geradezu an. Ken Scott, der Drehbuchautor: "Unser erstes Verführungsspiel bestand darin, das Vertrauen des Dorfs zu gewinnen. Sie hatten uns angekündigt, dass sie nicht zögern würden, uns zum Verlassen der Insel aufzufordern, sollten wir Leben zu sehr durcheinander bringen."
Jean-Francois Pouliot fügt hinzu: "Fox Island, die Insel, auf der die Kricketpartie veranstaltet wurde, wurde in Kricket Island umgetauft. Die Erinnerungen, die wir zurückliessen, können nicht zu schlecht sein."


Pressestimmen aus dem Ausland:
"The dramatic victor of Sundance was one of the festival´s half-buried treasures, the French-language SEDUCING DOCTOR LEWIS. A monster hit in its native Quebec, where it had more film award nominations than THE BARBARIAN INVASIONS and earned more money than THE LORD OF THE RINGS and THE MATRIX RELOADED, DOCTOR LEWIS tells the droll tale of the enormous trouble to which a tiny fishing village goes to get a doctor to relocate there. A warmhearted film of considerable elfin charm!"
Los Angeles Times
"LA GRANDE SEDUCTION is the title of the hottest Quebec film of the year, a charming inspirational comedy."
Variety
"It's odd to see Canada, the land of Egoyan and Cronenberg, serving up comic relief. But Quebec unveiled another crowd-pleaser at Cannes. In the Director's Fortnight sidebar, sponaneous applause and gales of laughter peppered the closing-night premiere of LA GRANDE SEDUCTION, a fable about a remote fishing village that tries to lure a cricket-loving doctor into setting up a practice. There is something truly bizarre about sitting in the dark on a sunny dain in the south of France watching a band of Québécois rustics improvise a cricket match on a windswept island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence."
MacLean's

Prescripting for an ailing village
A. O. Scott, New York Times, March 26, 2004
"Seducing Doctor Lewis," which will be shown tonight and tomorrow night in the New Directors/New Films series, takes place in a grizzled fishing village in Quebec. Its characters may speak French, but the film, the first feature directed by Jean-François Pouliot, would fit comfortably in a British comic tradition that stretches from the old Ealing Studios films to recent hits like "The Full Monty," passing through Bill Forsyth's Scotland along the way.
The movie finds humor in small-town idiosyncrasies, and also in economic hardship. The men of the village, Sainte-Marie-La-Mauderne, who once rose before dawn to take their living from the sea, now line up every morning for welfare checks. Germain Lesage (Raymond Bouchard), the portly, perpetually unshaven hero, is desperate to restore the town's decrepit pride. A plastics company is looking for a site for a new factory, and Germain places himself at the head of the campaign to promote Ste.-Marie. But the company stipulates that to be considered, the village must have a full-time resident doctor, one of many amenities it lacks.
Through complex and serendipitous circumstances, Christopher Lewis (David Boutin), an ambitious young Montreal internist, is lured away from the city, and what follows might be described as a subtitled amalgam of Mr. Forsyth's "Local Hero" and the television series "Northern Exposure."
The locals, under Germain's direction, try to refashion their hamlet into something Dr. Lewis will find irresistible. Discovering that he loves cricket, these die-hard hockey fans become practitioners of a decidedly unorthodox (and very funny) version of the game. One, a skittish fellow named Steve (Bruno Blanchet), must pretend to share the doctor's passion for unlistenable jazz fusion played at high volume. When Dr. Lewis goes fishing, a frozen fish is surreptitiously attached to his line.
"Seducing Doctor Lewis," which is to be released by Wellspring on July 16 nationwide, has an unusually commercial vibe for a New Directors selection. Its warm, sweet sentiments are genial and unchallenging, and its jokes are low-key and gentle.